Life & Style | 1 year ago
Small Steps, Giant Leaps: The first man on the moon
We've been featuring some of the most important events in the history of space travel, and now we've finally reached its most iconic moment.

We've been featuring some of the most important events in the history of space travel, and now we've finally reached its most iconic moment.

On July 20th, 1969, history was made as Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin stepped down on to the surface of the moon, changing the history of space travel forever.

Three astronauts left the Kennedy Space Centre in Florida on July 16th to make this historic mission, and while Armstrong and Aldrin landed down on to the surface of the moon, in the lunar module, Michael Collins steadied the ship in the Command Module, which would eventually land them safely back on Earth.

When Armstrong eventually stepped down on to the surface of the moon, he uttered the famous phrase now known worldwide by possibly every human being: “That's one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind”. Apparently, however, he was supposed to say “that's one small step for a man”, but since he was making history, we'll forgive him for the slip up.

John F. Kennedy had been the man who spearheaded this quest to arrive on the moon before the end of the 1960s, and they did so just in time to fulfil his promise.

When the crew eventually returned to Earth, on the 27th of July, they had to be quarantined, which is unfortunate for them since they had to wave at the President (Nixon) from a steel box. Not a great view.

This moment has been the subject of countless magazine covers, documentaries, and crazy conspiracy theories, but ultimately it would be looked back on as a “where were you when...” moment, forever part of human history and an incredibly exciting time for anyone who was around to witness it happen.

All the technology that went into building a spacecraft, which was able to land on the moon, has since been used and improved to bring us the computers and smart phones we own today, so maybe if you took your phone apart you could figure out how to get into space too (we wouldn't recommend it, though).

Alternatively, If you too want to make history without breaking a sweat, then head on over to lynxapollo.com and enter the competition to be the first Irishman in space.

See also: Space Cadets: Michael Healy-Rae
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