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Did you know typing 'sad' makes you sad and typing 'jolly' makes you jolly?
According to researchers, who obviously have way too much time on their hands, typing the word ‘sad’ makes you sad while typing ‘jolly’ makes you… jolly.

According to researchers, who obviously have way too much time on their hands, typing the word ‘sad’ makes you sad while typing ‘jolly’ makes you… jolly.

So how in the name of Jaysus does typing a word have an affect on your mood? Well, according to researchers from University College London and The New School for Social Research, New York, it’s all down to where the letters sit on the Qwerty keyboard.

The study suggests that typing words solely with your left hand makes you feel more negative about what you’re writing, whereas you fell better about words when you write them with your right hand. Yes, people are paid to find this stiff out.

Because of the letter arrangement on a standard Qwerty keypad, your left hand has to cover 15 letters while old righty only has to look after a mere 11. Well, in fairness, he has to keep his strength up for others things too.

Here’s the interesting part about the study’s findings. You might think that it’s all down to the left and right sides of our brain, but according to the researchers there’s a lot more to it.

As we said, there’s more work involved for your left hand whenever you’re typing and, over time (since 1868 - when Qwerty was invented), this has gradually made us feel less positive about words typed on the left hand side of the keyboard, and more positive about letters on the right. Mad, isn’t it?

So we enjoy typing words like ‘jolly’, ‘money’, ‘pink’ and ‘hippie’, but we dislike writing words like ‘sad’ and ‘tax’, because those letters are on the left side of the Qwerty keyboard.

Speaking about the new findings, Kyle Jasmin of University College London and Daniel Casasanto of The New School for Social Research, New York, said: "Widespread typing introduces a new mechanism by which changes in the meaning of words can arise.

"People responsible for naming new products, brands, and companies might do well to consider the potential advantages of consulting their keyboards and choosing the 'right' name."

See what he did there?

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