Food safety authority issues warning after Leo Varadkar posts meal prep on Instagram 1 year ago

Food safety authority issues warning after Leo Varadkar posts meal prep on Instagram

The FSAI had some recommendations.

A social media photo from Leo Varadkar showcasing his meal prep for the week has garnered such a big reaction online that the Food Safety Authority of Ireland (FSAI) has even weighed in on the picture.

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The image was published on the Tánaiste's official Instagram on Monday morning and shows 16 tubs in a fridge containing a variety of pre-cooked meals.

Crediting the organisation of the fridge's contents to his partner Matt Barrett, Varadkar wrote: "Matt has the meal prep done for the week. Fair play!"

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While quite an innocuous post, the image sparked curiosity in a number of social media users.

Some struggled to decipher what the foods in the boxes actually were, while others questioned if the meals would actually be appetising.

However, tagging the FSAI in a Twitter comment about the Tánaiste's photo, one person wrote:

"Not being funny but are all of these particular foods safe to prepare in advance like this? I’ve my doubts about some of the elements here."

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In response, the FSAI said that "storing batched cooked or leftover food safely will reduce the risk of possible food poisoning".

"By safely we mean that the food should be stored in the fridge (at between 0-5°C) or freezer (at -18°C or less) within 2 hours of cooking and used within 2-3 days," it added.

"Reheat the stored food to 70°C or higher at the core of the food.

"It should be very hot and steaming before it is served," it also said, before providing a link to its website for more information.

Replying to the FSAI, the same Twitter user who posted the original question asked: "Lids or no lids?".

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To this, the Irish food safety authority responded: "Generally we recommend that lids are used.

"But if there is no risk of cross-contamination from raw foods to cooked or ready-to-eat foods, then it should be safe."

There you have it. The experts have spoken.

Main images via Instagram / Leo Varakdar