Evidence of rodent activity among reasons for six enforcement orders for Irish food businesses in February 2 months ago

Evidence of rodent activity among reasons for six enforcement orders for Irish food businesses in February

Ever eaten in any of these places?

Evidence of rodent activity and rodent droppings found in food storage areas, posing a risk of contamination to foodstuffs, were among the reasons for the issuing of six enforcement orders to Irish food businesses last month.

According to the Food Safety Authority of Ireland (FSAI), out of date meat foodstuffs displayed on the shop floor, failure to ensure adequate pest control and pest proofing - allowing pests/rodents ease of access to the premise - and evidence of crates of unidentified and untraceable processed raw meat items found in a walk-in freezer were also cited as reasons for orders issued in February.

Six Enforcement Orders were served on food businesses for breaches of food safety legislation, pursuant to the FSAI Act, 1998. The Enforcement Orders were issued by environmental health officers in the Health Service Executive (HSE).

Four Closure Orders were served under the FSAI Act, 1998 on:

  • Anu’s Kitchen, Unit 3, Glen Abbey Complex, Belgard Road, Tallaght, Dublin 24 (Order served on 1 February, order lifted on 12 February)
  • Costa Coffee, Pearse Street, Ballina, Mayo (Order served on 10 February, order lifted on 12 February)
  • Camile Thai (Closed area: upstairs attic storage space) (Restaurant/Café), Looney’s Cross, Bishopstown, Cork (Order served on 20 February, order lifted on 6 March)
  • Polish Grocery Janosiki (Closed area: the rear external yard which was being used to smoke meats), 17 Mary Street, Dungarvan, Waterford (Order served on 21 February)

Two Prohibition Orders were served under the FSAI Act, 1998 on:

  • LuckyMe Limited (Retailer), Unit 3 & 4, 90 Lagan Road, Dublin Industrial Estate, Glasnevin, Dublin 11
  • Polish Grocery Janosiki, 17 Mary Street, Dungarvan, Waterford

More details on the closure orders are available on the FSAI website here.

Commenting on the orders, Dr Pamela Byrne, Chief Executive, FSAI, highlighted the need for food businesses to maintain adequate hygiene standards in the interest of protecting consumer health.

“February’s Enforcement Orders demonstrate the importance of regular and consistent checks by businesses to ensure safe food practices are in place and adhered to in the interest of protecting consumer health,” Byrne said.

“There are no excuses for food business owners failing to comply with all relevant food safety and hygiene standards. It is a legal responsibility. Contamination of food and inadequate food safety management systems can lead to immediate danger to consumer health. This remains one of the main reasons why food inspectors are forced to serve Enforcement Orders on non-compliant food businesses.”

Details of the food businesses served with Enforcement Orders are published on the FSAI’s website.

Closure Orders and Improvement Orders will remain listed on the website for a period of three months from the date of when a premises is adjudged to have corrected its food safety issue, with Prohibition Orders being listed for a period of one month.