Six Irish food businesses were served with closure orders in March 2 weeks ago

Six Irish food businesses were served with closure orders in March

A large amount of rodent droppings and a slug on the wall were amongst the reasons for the closure orders.

Six food businesses in Ireland were served with closure orders for breaches of food safety legislation during the month of February, according to the Food Safety Authority of Ireland.

The food businesses were issued with closure orders for breaches of food safety legislation, pursuant to the FSAI Act, 1998 and the EC (Official Control of Foodstuffs) Regulations, 2010.

One business was also issued with a Prohibition Order under the EC (Official Control of Foodstuffs) Regulations, 2010.

Four Closure Orders were served under the FSAI Act, 1998 on:

  • Taka Ra (Restaurant/Café), 37 Abbey Street Upper, Dublin 1
  • Cuppa City Coffee (Restaurant/Café), 3 Roger Casement Square, Cobh, Cork
  • The Old Punch Bowl (Pub) (Closed area: kitchen and food storage area on first floor only, bars not affected), 116 Rock Road, Booterstown, County Dublin
  • Xian Street Food (Restaurant/Café) (Closed area: satellite kitchen at 8 Quay Street. There is no part of the premises at 9 Quay Street Galway closed), 9 Quay Street, Galway

Two Closure Orders were served under the EC (Official Control of Foodstuffs) Regulations, 2010 on:

  • Victoria Asian Cuisine (Restaurant/Café), 5a The Crescent, Monkstown, County Dublin
  • Gourmet Tart Company (Manufacturing), Unit 1, Block 13, Ballybane Industrial Estate, Tuam Road, Galway

One Prohibition Order was served under the EC (Official Control of Foodstuffs) Regulations, 2010 on:

  • Gourmet Tart Company (Manufacturing), Unit 1, Block 13, Ballybane Industrial Estate, Tuam Road, Galway

More details on the closure orders are available on the FSAI website here.

Under the FSAI Act, 1998, a Closure Order is served where it is deemed that there is or there is likely to be a grave and immediate danger to public health at or in the premises; or where an Improvement Order is not complied with. Closure Orders can refer to the immediate closure of all or part of the food premises, or all or some of its activities.

Under the EC (Official Control of Foodstuffs) Regulations, 2010, Closure Orders and Prohibition Orders are served where there is a non-compliance with food legislation.

Some of the reasons for closures included a large amount of rodent droppings scattered on the floor of a dry goods store directly adjacent to a kitchen, a large amount of rodent droppings noted at the back of upright and chest freezers, no adequate pest control measures in place, large containers for mixing foodstuffs that had a foul odour and a slug on the wall adjacent to a dishwasher.

Dr Pamela Byrne, Chief Executive, FSAI, emphasised that food businesses are not providing adequate care for their customers if they do not have a pest control system in place.

"The most common non-compliances identified in Irish food businesses during March were a significant lack of pest control, coupled with filthy conditions. It is alarming to see consistent reporting of rodent activity noted in food businesses," she said.

"Rodents harbour bacteria and spread harmful pathogens, contaminating food and surfaces. Food inspectors continue to encounter cases where consumers’ health is put at risk through a failure to comply with pest control and hygiene requirements, which is unacceptable.

"Food businesses run the risk of making their customers sick through exposing food to pests and ruining their reputation with consumers by neglecting basic food safety management and hygiene standards.Negligent practices will not be tolerated."