Study finds important link between mental illness and a very common condition 7 years ago

Study finds important link between mental illness and a very common condition

It’s natural that when we get nervous we get sweaty palms but according to a recent study published in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, extreme sweating is an indication of anxiety and depression.

The study was authored by 11 various doctors and found that people with a condition called hyperhidrosis are highly likely to have higher rates of chronic anxiety and depression.

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The study found the prevalence of anxiety and depression was 21.3% and 27.2% in patients with hyperhidrosis, respectively, and 7.5% and 9.7% in patients without the condition.

Debra Jaliman, an assistant professor of dermatology at the Icahn School of Medicine, spoke to ATTN: about the study.

"Excess anxiety makes people sweat more, can make them shake, and causes redness of the face. These are all the physical manifestations of anxiety,” said Jaliman.

According to Aesthic Surgery Ireland, approximately 2-3% of the population suffers from hyperhidrosis.

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Primary Focal HyperHidrosis (PFHH) is the most common form of hyperhidrosis and is defined as excessive sweating, not caused by physical activity, that appears symmetrically in a localised fashion. It may be an inherited condition that usually appears in adolescence, but it can also begin in childhood or even in infancy.

PFHH most frequently affects the underarms, hands and feet but can appear in other areas.