AA Roadwatch reveal the roads and routes most disrupted by crashes in May 4 months ago

AA Roadwatch reveal the roads and routes most disrupted by crashes in May

No surprise that the M50 tops the list.

AA Roadwatch have revealed that Dublin’s M50 motorway accounted for 8% of collisions that were reported to them in the month of May.

An analysis carried out by the AA’s traffic & travel information service on traffic disruption showed that the motorway is the route that's most likely to be affected.

During the month of May, 19 incidents were reported on the M50.

AA Roadwatch also noted a higher number of incidents on the M7/N7, a route which includes ongoing roadworks and lane restrictions near Naas, with a total of 23 combined crashes.

Other high activity routes include the M1, where seven crashes were recorded.

The N4/M4 (between Sligo town and Dublin) and N11/M11 (between Dublin and Wexford) both recorded nine crashes.

Elsewhere, six collisions were reported on the N40 in Cork.

Over the course of the month, the most incidents were recorded on the national route network (N-Roads) with 31% of collisions.

25% of the crashes reported were on motorways, while 12.5% of collisions occurred on regional routes.

Dublin had the most incidents in the month of May with 109 collisions reported. Cork was second and Limerick third.

The Dublin Port Tunnel and the Limerick Tunnel were both closed three times each.

The N84 in Mayo had to close twice due to collisions and there were two separate closures on the Limerick stretch of the N21 over the course of the month as well.

Speaking about these findings, Ruth Jephson, editor of AA Roadwatch said:

“Even a small incident can cause a lot of trouble on a motorway. On a rural road, for example, a minor crash may cause so little disruption to traffic that it may not warrant inclusion in our reports.

"However, a similar incident when it takes place on a motorway could potentially temporarily block a land. As a result, even thought the people involved in the crash could be perfectly fine, the knock-on impact on traffic could be much greater.”