Dublin's street traders reveal their Grand National secrets 3 years ago

Dublin's street traders reveal their Grand National secrets

How do you choose a Grand National winner?

Everyone has their own approach to choosing a horse in the Aintree Grand National. Some people study the form and go for the appliance of science. Others simply choose a name that they like.

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Ladbrokes took to the streets of Dublin to see how street traders in the Liberties picked their horse for the biggest race of all.

Hayley O'Conner chatted to Kathleen Farrell, Glenda Sarsfield and David O'Connor to find out who they fancied in this year's race.

Definitly Red may be the current 10/1 favourite but the feeling off Thomas Street was "Definitly NOT Red." At 14/1, Cause Of Causes was much preferred to give JP McManus another victory. One For Arthur was also popular at 12/1, which was hardly surprising with Arthur's Pub in the heart of the Liberties. There was also lots of love for Ruby Walsh and Pleasant Company at 14/1. 

"Millions of people will tune into the Grand National on Saturday, and for some it will be the only race they'll watch for the year," said Hayley O'Connor of Ladbrokes. "The nice thing about this race is they have as much chance of picking the winner as the experts do so it's fun for all.

"All the runners' odds are in double figures which means even a fiver will have a nice return if you back the winner, and if they're placed in the first five you won't be empty-handed." 

Ireland's Katie Walsh was cleared to ride Wonderful Charm in the race when doctors confirmed her arm was bruised not broken, after a fall at the course on Thursday. Ladbrokes are offering 20/1 that this year's winning jockey will be female. 

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Walsh would be the first woman in history to win it if she is successful on her 33/1 shot. In 2012, Katie secured the highest-ever Grand National finish by a female when she was third on Seabass, a horse trained by her father Ted.

Ladbrokes is offering just 2/1 that the winner will be Irish-trained. Ireland are currently responsible for 11 of the 40-runner field.