Scientists warn Los Angeles is due a mega-storm that could be three times more damaging than an earthquake 1 year ago

Scientists warn Los Angeles is due a mega-storm that could be three times more damaging than an earthquake

Apparently it isn't a matter of if, but when.

The population of Los Angeles can probably freshly recall the effects of drought and water restrictions in their state, but there is set to be a "storm of biblical proportions" inbound, which could last for weeks, put millions out of their homes, cause dams to flood and create new lakes, with damages predicted to reach as much as $725 billion.

A series of reports on the mega-storm have been compiled, which could be up to three times more destructive than an earthquake on the San Andreas fault-line.

Described as the ARkStorm Scenario by the U.S. Geological Study - which, admittedly, sounds like an action movie you might find Gerard Butler starring in - the hypothetical storm depicted here would strike the US west coast and be similar to the intense California winter storms of 1861 and 1862 that left the central valley of California impassable.

The mega-storm is estimated to produce precipitation that in many places exceeds levels only experienced on average once every 500 to 1,000 years.

According to The Los Angeles Times, several officials from the U.S. Department of Interior and the U.S. Geological Survey have sought to raise awareness of the threat of mega-storms and promote emergency preparedness in recent years. but have met challenges in characterising the scale of such storms.

While there is no set predicted timeframe for the storm itself, David Reid, a water historian and expert on the LA region, suggested that "the false sense of security included in the phrase ‘900-year flood’ combined with the promises of 20th century water infrastructure have put us in a bind".

"That’s because a mega-flood is impossible to predict. And if the water infrastructure fails, we’re in big trouble," Reid added.